Discuss The Role of the Informatics Specialist in Healthcare.
December 11, 2019 Comments Off on Discuss The Role of the Informatics Specialist in Healthcare. Assignment Assignment help

The Role of the Informatics Specialist in Healthcare

When a patient needed to receive two units of packed red blood cells (PRBC), the process in regards to the EMR were not exactly seamless. We transferred over to a record system known as Epic back in April and a few bumps have been encountered along the way. Recently, more and more patients have required blood transfusions which has uprooted problems within the new system. A patient required PRBC immediately however, problems with barcodes and their recognition have been inconsistent posing a patient safety issue. I realized this issue and brought my concerns to the lead educators. After much discussion with nurse executives and educators, a solution was brought to Epic representatives. Specific modifications are in the works in order to make the blood transfusion aspect of the software more user-friendly and efficient.

For information/data to be accessible, timely, and accurate nursing informatics must play a role. Innovations within medical technology are improving daily and with this comes an increasing need for informatics. In order for informatics to make an impact, its accessibility to nurses is pivotal to provide optimal care for their patients (Macieria, Smith, Davis, Yao, Wilkie, Lopez, & Keenan, 2017). For example, the communication and time that it takes for a nurse to recognize the flaw and for that flaw to be fixed is a lengthy process that must become more efficient. According to Wang, Kung, and Byrd (2016), hiring individuals who have a firm background in information technology and analytical skills would allow the utilization of data outputs and would effectively equip managers and employees to make accurate interpretations of results.

Lastly, a culture that warrants sharing of information and big data is needed in order to properly implement new information management systems. Nurse executive are responsible for cultivating a positive attitude towards new innovations and program implementations. According to Wang, Kung, and Byrd (2016), this action is critical in order to reduce any negative thoughts towards the new systems from physician and nurses. Although it is imperative that each individual play a role in the establishment of new management systems, the roles of chief nursing officers and nurse executives are key. Thew (2016), states that chief nurses must involve themselves with the data revolution in order to ensure that nurses receive the full benefits.

References

Macieria, T. G. R., Smith, M. B., Davis, N., Yao, Y., Wilkie, D. J., Lopez, K. D., & Keenan, G. (2017). Evidence of progress in making nursing practice visible using standardized nursing data: A systematic review. AMIA Annual Symposium Proceedings, 2017, 1205–1214. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5977718/

Thew, J. (2016). Big data means big potential, challenges for nurse execs. Retrieved from https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/nursing/big-data-means-big-potential-challenges-nurse-execs

Wang, Y., Kung, L., & Byrd, T. A. (2018). Big data analytics: Understanding its capabilities and potential benefits for healthcare organizations. Technological Forecasting & Social Change, 126, 3–13. https://doi-org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1016/j.techfore.2015.12.019

RECOURSE

McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. G. (2017). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (4th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Chapter 25, “The Art of Caring in Technology-Laden Environments” (pp. 525–535)
Chapter 26, “Nursing Informatics and the Foundation of Knowledge” (pp. 537–551)
American Nurses Association. (2018). Inclusion of recognized terminologies supporting nursing practice within electronic health records and other health information technology solutions. Retrieved from https://www.nursingworld.org/practice-policy/nursing-excellence/official-position-statements/id/Inclusion-of-Recognized-Terminologies-Supporting-Nursing-Practice-within-Electronic-Health-Records/

Macieria, T. G. R., Smith, M. B., Davis, N., Yao, Y., Wilkie, D. J., Lopez, K. D., & Keenan, G. (2017). Evidence of progress in making nursing practice visible using standardized nursing data: A systematic review. AMIA Annual Symposium Proceedings, 2017, 1205–1214. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5977718/

Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. (2017). Standard nursing terminologies: A landscape analysis. Retrieved from https://www.healthit.gov/sites/default/files/snt_final_05302017.pdf

Rutherford, M. A. (2008). Standardized nursing language: What does it mean for nursing practice? Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 13(1), 1–12. doi:10.3912/OJIN.Vol13No01PPT05.

Note: You will access this article from the Walden Library databases.

Thew, J. (2016, April 19). Big data means big potential, challenges for nurse execs. Retrieved from https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/nursing/big-data-means-big-potential-challenges-nurse-execs

Topaz, M. (2013). The hitchhiker’s guide to nursing theory: Using the Data-Knowledge-Information-Wisdom framework to guide informatics research. Online Journal of Nursing Informatics, 17(3).

Note: You will access this article from the Walden Library databases.

Wang, Y. Kung, L., & Byrd, T. A. (2018). Big data analytics: Understanding its capabilities and potential benefits for healthcare organizations. Technological Forecasting and Social Change, 126(1), 3–13. doi:10.1016/j.techfore.2015.12.019.

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