Explain in 3 or more sentences why the narrator is called crazy in the “The Proposal” by Anton Chekhov.
June 8, 2020 Comments Off on Explain in 3 or more sentences why the narrator is called crazy in the “The Proposal” by Anton Chekhov. Uncategorized Assignment-help

4/6Read “The Proposal” by Anton Chekhov. (I sent you a copy of this play.) Quote at least 3 exchanges of conversation/dialogue where there is a misunderstanding between two characters.*4/7Write your own dialogue between two characters about a misunderstanding between them. Have at least 15 exchanges. (Each person speaks or replies at least 15 times.)*Monday, April 20:(1) Read “The Drill” by Breena Clarke (*find this story in an attachment and in the Content section of our class on Blackboard); and (2) in 3 or more sentences, explain why Clarke calls it “The Drill.” This is not a “European” story; it’s a New York story, but I wanted us all to read about the anxieties that parents (particularly mothers) can have about their children. Submit your sentences via email by 11:30 a.m. on April 20.Tuesday, April 21:(1) Read “Alyosha the Pot” by Leo Tolstoy (*find this story in an attachment and in the Content section of our class on Blackboard); and (2) write at least 3 questions you have about any aspect of this story. Submit your questions via email by 11:30 a.m. on April 21.Thursday, April 23:(1) Read the Sherlock Holmes story “A Scandal in Bohemia” by Arthur Conan Doyle (*find this story in an attachment and in the Content section of our class on Blackboard); and (2) write at least 2 questions you have about any aspect of this story. (3) Quote a sentence from it that you find significant and explain its significance. Submit (2) & (3) via email by 11:30 a.m. on April 23.April 281) Read “With Other Eyes” by Luigi Pirandello (*find this story in an attachment and in the Content section of our class on Blackboard); and (2) write at least 3 questions you have about any aspect of this story. Submit your questions via email by 11:30 a.m. on April 28.Thursday, April 30:(1) Read “The Horla” by Guy de Maupassant (*find this story in an attachment and in the Content section of our class on Blackboard); (2) quote at least 2 significant sentences or passages and cite the page numbers; and (3) in at least 3 sentences, explain the last paragraph. Submit your quotations and sentences via email by 11:30 a.m. on April 30.Monday, May 4:(1) Read Short Poems from Europe. (2) Choose one poem you like and feel that you understand and explain what you like and understand about it (5 sentences minimum); (3) quote at least one line or stanza from it (when you quote, respect and acknowledge the line endings; poems use line-endings as a measurement, whereas prose uses periods). (4) Submit your sentences via email by 11:30 a.m. on May 5.Tuesday, May 5:(1) Re-read Short Poems from Europe. (2) Choose one poem you feel you still don’t understand; ask at least 3 specific questions about any aspects of your incomprehension or confusion. (3) Quote at least one line or stanza from it (respect the line endings; poems use line-endings as a measurement, whereas prose uses periods) that frustrates your understanding. (4) Submit your questions and quotation via email by 11:30 a.m. on May 6.Thursday, May 7:(1) Look at the titles and first lines of the poems in Short Poems from Europe. (2) Choose one title or first line and write at least 6 lines of your own poem using that title or line as your starting or inspiration point, or write a short reflection or story using that title or line as your starting or inspiration point. Submit your poem or reflection or essay or story via email by 11:30 a.m. on May 8.***Monday, May 11:(1) Read the mini-plays, “Playlets by English 35 Students,” a compilation written by your classmates. (It consists of class assignments written by you, the students of English 35.) (2) Instructions: After you have read all of them, choose the two that you find the most similar to each other. Write at least 8 sentences comparing and contrasting them. Submit your sentences via email by 11:30 a.m. on May 12.May 14Read “Typhus” by Anton Chekhov. Here is the link if you prefer one to the attachment: https://russianlife.com/stories/online/dr-anton-chekhov-and-the-typhus-epidemic/Explain 2 things: (1) Why is Klimov experiencing “life-joy”? (“This terrible unexpected news fully entered Klimov’s consciousness, yet as terrible and powerful as it was, it could not overwhelm the life-joy that filled the recovering lieutenant.”) (2) Contemplating the last sentence of the story, what is Klimov’s “irreversible loss”? Submit your explanations via email by 11:30 a.m. on May 14.Monday, May 18:Read Chapters I-V of “Kashtanka” by Anton Chekhov; write at least 3 questions you have about any aspect of the story. Submit your sentences via email by 11:30 a.m. on May 18.Tuesday, May 19:Read Chapters VI-VII of “Kashtanka” by Anton Chekhov; in 3 sentences or more, explain why you have loved or hated this story. Submit your sentences via email by 11:30 a.m. on May 19. Please attend the Blackboard Collaborate session at 11:30 a.m.Thursday, May 21:1) Before you read “Sleepy” by Anton Chekhov, describe in 5 or more sentences how you feel and behave when you are sleepy; 2) read “Sleepy”; 3) write at least 3 questions you have about any aspect of the story.Tuesday, May 26:1) Read 3 essays by Karl Ove Knausgaard: “Operation” (pp. 243-246); “Toothbrushes” (145-148); “Winter Boots” (199-202). 2) Quote one sentence from any of the three and cite its page and then use it as the first sentence of your own 10-minute mini-essay. That is, let Knausgaard inspire a piece of your own writing. Please attend the Blackboard Collaborate session at 11:30 a.m.Thursday, May 28:Read “Crazy They Call Me” by Zadie Smith. Explain in 3 or more sentences why the narrator is called crazy. Submit your sentences via email by 11:30 a.m. on May 28.Monday, June 1:Read “Mistress” by Lara Vapnyar.