How does this personal story reflect your own, or others’, positionality? How does this story reflect varying views on the nature of knowledge? How does this story reflect ideas and assumptions that were taken for granted? How might this story reflect oppression or domination? How might it reflect privilege?
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Overview At this point in the course, you have reviewed many important concepts in the realm of social justice education. You have learned to analyze your own social position and how it has influenced the person you have become. You have examined the very fabric of knowledge itself to understand the complex context from which it emerged/emerges. You have explored the ways by which education systems are shaped by structural quests for power and domination, the ways by which this quest has sometimes systematically oppressed people, and also some ways in which domination has been resisted. Finally, you have explored how education may be used as a tool for transforming our social landscape by welcoming diverse perspectives on the world. The Task Now it is time to integrate your understanding across these modules. In this reflective analysis, you will look closely at a personal experience you have had as a student through, and consider it the lens of the course readings. This experience may have occurred at any time during your educational career, from primary school to university. It may be pivotal in your own personal life narrative, or is perhaps something you’ve recalled in light of our conversations here. It may be something you have already spoken about in discussion with your peers. There is no “right” experience in this context. The main virtues of this story should be that it is an authentic experience that you have had, and that you will now look at in the light of what you have learned in the course. The purpose is to examine your lived experience more closely to gain deeper understanding. Please write this in two parts: 1. A narrative that clearly and evocatively shows your experience: Aim to show your genuine experience (the way you would tell a story) in about 400 words. This is your story. Be honest about what you saw, experienced, felt and thought (or didn’t think or feel, at the time). Allow your narrative to come alive by helping your reader to see it the way you experienced it; make things clear for us. You can bring in dialogue, and your own sensory experience (what you saw, heard, and felt). If you aim to show what happened, rather than just telling about it, your story will be more compelling. 2. A reflective analysis of your narrative Now, reflect on your experience by a little more analytically by using the critical concepts you’ve learned in the course. Consider and select at least 3 key concepts from below that apply to your experience. Please state your chosen concepts clearly before relating them to your experience. The analysis should be approximately 400 words long. How does this personal story reflect your own, or others’, positionality? How does this story reflect varying views on the nature of knowledge? How does this story reflect ideas and assumptions that were taken for granted? How might this story reflect oppression or domination? How might it reflect privilege? For example, is a group of people keeping power for themselves? Is someone being ignored, dismissed or exploited? Did you or others in your story resist oppression? If so, how, and what happened? Does this story reflect your own or others’ resilience? If so, how? In your analysis, please make at least 2 specific references to the readings, and cite them using a recognised style (e.g. APA or MLA). You can find information on correct citation through the SFU library Cite and Write page. You may find that some of these concepts overlap with each other, but try to relate 3 of them as distinctly as possible to the nature of your personal experience. Your experience may better reflect concepts from some modules than others, and that is fine. You will use 2 different modes and genres of writing here: the first part is narrative writing, which is a lot like storytelling; the second is reflective analysis. Since what you are sharing is personal in nature, know that you are not being evaluated on your experience itself. Rather, I will consider how your narrative clearly shows your experience, and how you have analyzed this experience according to the course concepts you have selected. Are you using those concepts accurately and critically? Are you making meaningful connections to course ideas and readings? Please see the rubric below for specifics as to how you will be evaluated in this section. Submission format Your submission should be Approximately 800 words long (400 on the story; 400 on the analysis), single-spaced 12 point font, with 1″ margins all around – over 900 words will incur penalties Include your name at the top of the page (no cover page needed) References should include course readings and materials only Name your file in the following format: LastName, FirstName – Reflective Analysis – EDUC 100 Evaluation Criteria: Your narrative is compellingly conveyed and shows well your authentic experience Your analysis appropriately connects at least 3 core concepts in the course to your story Your analysis demonstrates strong understanding of the course concepts explored Your analysis is insightful, bringing richer understanding to your experience Your writing is coherent, clear and easy to understand: the narrative as well as the reflective Your writing is easy to read with appropriate grammar, spelling and mechanics Reflective Analysis of Educational Experience Reflective Analysis of Educational Experience (25 pt) Reflective Analysis of Educational Experience (25 pt) Criteria Ratings Pts This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeNarrative Your narrative is compellingly conveyed and shows well your authentic experience 10 pts Excellent Your narrative is compellingly written, shows well your experience, and gets the reader involved in the experience with you. 8 pts Good Your narrative is easy to understand, and shows well what happened in your experience. 5 pts Satisfactory/minimal Your narrative is somewhat easy to understand, but lacks effort in the way it is conveyed. 10 pts This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeReflective Analysis Your analysis appropriately connects at least 3 core concepts in the course to your story, demonstrates strong understanding of the course concepts explored, and is insightful, bringing richer understanding to your experience 10 pts Excellent Your reflection accurately links 3 or more concepts to your narrative, and provides thoughtful analysis. It also shows clear insights and meaningful new understanding you have gained. 8 pts Good Your reflection accurately links 3 concepts to your narrative and provides reasonable analysis. 5 pts Satisfactory/minimal Your reflection links 3 concepts to your narrative but lacks duly thoughtful or accurate analysis. 10 pts This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeWriting Your writing is coherent, clear and easy to understand: the narrative as well as the reflective. It is easy to read with appropriate grammar, spelling and mechanics 5 pts Excellent Your writing flows clearly and well, allowing us to be fully absorbed in the narrative and to understand your analysis in good depth. There is a high degree of accuracy in language. 4 pts Good Your writing is clear and easy to read; no major errors to detract from your meaning. 3 pts Satisfactory/minimal Your writing gets the main points across, but errors or lack of effort in organization, clarity and language make parts of it difficult to understand. 5 pts Total Points: 25 Readings/Viewings Notes Sensoy & DiAngelo (2017) Links to an external site. , Chapter 2: Critical thinking and critical theory. In Is everyone really equal? An introduction to key concepts in social justice education Second edition. Teachers College Press, pp. 23-34. An introduction to both critical thinking and critical theory, with illustrations of the difference between having unexamined assumptions and opinions and engaging in critical reflection. Davidson, S. & Davidson, R. (2018) Links to an external site. . Ch. 2: The story of sk’ad’a.” In Potlatch as pedagogy. Portage and Main Press. A corner stone chapter of the book, which presents the nine Sk’ad’a (or learning) principles of Haida education, discussed throughout the book and course. Little Bear, L. (2000). Download Little Bear, L. (2000). Jagged worldviews colliding. In M. Battiste (Ed.) Reclaiming Indigenous Voice and Vision, pp.77-85. Vancouver, BC: UBC Press A conversational essay that introduces readers to the basic values and perspectives of Indigenous philosophy, specifically from a ‘Plains’ perspective. Readings/Viewings Notes Sensoy & DiAngelo (2017) Links to an external site. , What is critical social Justice and Prologue: A parable. In Is everyone really equal? An introduction to key concepts in social justice education Second edition. Teachers College Press, pp. xix-xxi and xxv-xxvii. Begin your reading with these short passages; they give a helpful introduction to ideas we’ll be exploring through the course: critical social justice and post-colonial thought. They will help you to better understand the important reading that comes next. Sensoy & DiAngelo (2017) Links to an external site. , Chapter 1: How to engage constructively in courses that take a critical justice approach. In Is everyone really equal? An introduction to key concepts in social justice education Second edition. Teachers College Press, pp. 1-22. Our most important reading for this Module: this chapter outlines 5 guidelines in how to engage in social justice discourse. You will want to give yourself lots of time for this one. McIntosh, P. (1989, July/August) Download McIntosh, P. (1989, July/August) . White privilege: Unpacking the invisible knapsack. Peace and Freedom. In this short article, the author shares her experience of considering some important privileges she didn’t realize she had, until she began to reflect on them intentionally. Davidson, S. & Davidson, R. (2018) Links to an external site. . Introduction and Chapter 1: Two working together. In Potlatch as pedagogy. Portage and Main Press, pp; 7-10. Sara and Robert Davidson are a father and daughter pair; in these very short chapters, they introduce the background to their ideas on learning. This background is very much rooted in their Indigenous culture and also in place, family and resistance to the forces of colonialism. Readings/Viewings Notes Sensoy & DiAngelo (2017) Links to an external site. , Chapter 5: Oppression and power. In Is everyone really equal? An introduction to key concepts in social justice education Second edition. Teachers College Press, pp. 60-79. This chapter will introduce you to some foundational module concepts: power, oppression (including the “isms”), and domination. Hence, why you may wish to start here. Sensoy & DiAngelo (2017) Links to an external site. , Chapter 8: Understanding the structural nature of oppression through racism. In Is everyone really equal? An introduction to key concepts in social justice education Second edition. Teachers College Press, pp. 119-140. This chapter reiterates the structural nature of oppression through the example of racism. The structural nature of racism means that racism is more than just the actions of overtly racist, “mean” individuals. Here we review the ways in which racism has intentionally been baked into our way of life in Canada (often in ways that dominant groups would never see). Barman, J. (2012). Download Barman, J. (2012). Schooled for inequality: The education of British Columbia’s Aboriginal children. In S. Z. Burke & P. Milewski (Eds.), Schooling in transition: Readings in Canadian history of education (pp. 255–276). Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division. This piece recounts the history of the residential school system in British Columbia. This system is argued to have failed in its goal to assimilate Indigenous peoples, and instead was a system built on, and with the consequence of, creating and perpetuating systemic inequality and disadvantage. Davidson, S. & Davidson, R. (2018) Links to an external site. . Ch. 3: We were once silenced. In Potlach as pedagogy. Portage & Main Press, 23-24. This chapter brings to life many of the concepts discussed in this module. The ways by which the Haida were systematically oppressed – through historical, ideological, institutional, and cultural power – is told through the story of the Davidson family. This story illustrates the internalization of domination that minoritized groups can experience. Yet, importantly, this piece also explores the resistance to said oppression, and the feeling of power born of resilience. Readings/Viewings Notes Sensoy & DiAngelo (2017) Links to an external site. , Chapter 12: Putting it all together. In Is everyone really equal? An introduction to key concepts in social justice education Second edition. Teachers College Press, pp. 199-218. In this chapter, you will read about several practical ways that you can interrupt dynamic oppressions and inform critical social justice. I’d like you to pay attention to Frank Chin’s example on page 209. After reading this chapter, start to think about movies, novels, or any media productions that you have encountered and the patterns of these media productions that reinforce certain privileges, assumptions, or ideologies. Adese, J. (2014). Download Adese, J. (2014). Spirit gifting: Ecological knowing in Métis life narratives. Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society, 3(3), pp. 48-66. You will read about Jennifer Adese’s personal story and her positions with Métis ways of knowing, her connections to the Métis community and her specific relationships with the land she resided. Pay attention to how Adese frames her story as a transformative way to inform critical social justice. Joshee, R. (2004). Download Joshee, R. (2004). Citizenship and multicultural education in Canada: From assimilation to social cohesion. In J. A. Banks (Ed.), Diversity and citizenship education: Global perspectives (pp. 127–156). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, pp. 150-152. Required Reading is pages 150 to 152 (From the section heading, “Education for Peace: An Alternate Future” through to the end of the article.) The rest of the article is optional. Joshee layouts the history of multiculturalism for us. When you read, try to draw a timeline of the the events so that you will gradually understand why Joshee wants to promote peace education – a way to inform social justice in the society.

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