Write one meaty paragraph: what is Achilles’ personality like and why do you think so?
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use all the prompt this time1. As we begin in medias res, it is clear that Achilles and Agamemnon have a history of resentment. This isn’t the first time they have tangled, and this is conveyed in the way they speak to and about each other. It is sometimes conveyed by how they avoid speaking about each other. They also know how to push each other’s buttons. The text describes it as “a stand-off, their battle of words” (1.318). 2. Write one meaty paragraph: what is Agamemnon’s personality like and why do you think so? 3. Write one meaty paragraph: what is Achilles’ personality like and why do you think so? What do his actions after his verbal fight with Agamemnon add to your picture of him? 4. Powerful language: choose a passage of at least 3 lines but no more than 6 from pp. 239-242. Why do you like it? What do both its ideas and language convey? 5. Focusing on their actions and words, examine the relationship between Zeus and Hera. If you could sum it up in one word, what would that word be? Then, in a paragraph, explain why you have chosen that word and how you see it in the way they respond to each other. When you are finished, submit your completed exercises in the appropriate dropbox. You can find it under the Course Content for this unit, “Assignments,” or here: Unit 2B: Iliad Book 1 ExercisesPurposeYou have read the text and deepened your knowledge of its background. Now it is time for you to start actually digging into the text yourself. This is where the fun begins.Guidelines and InstructionsHere is what you need to know about these (and other) exercises:1. You need to go back to your book, examine details, and think about them. Your submitted responses should not be “off the cuff” or relying on your memory. 2. Read the prompt carefully and be sure to respond as precisely as you can. 3. Note any specific instructions or indications of length/depth. 4. Make sure you refer to and explain specific details in your responses. 5. Type your work in a Word document. Be sure to save and keep an electronic copy for yourself. 6. Your answers should, of course, be your own. Unless specifically directed, you should not refer to any other outside sources (whether online, print, or another’s aid) beyond your brain and your textbook. This includes reading guides such as SparkNotes. Any reference material that does get included should be cited appropriately. See the “Academic Integrity” statement on the course policy for further information.7. When finished, submit your work in the appropriate dropbox (if you have not done this before, you will find instructions on the class’s Brightspace homepage). It is important that you submit it to the appropriate place, as that is where I will look for it. Conventions for quoting from a multi-book long poemSome of you may know this. If so, review. If this is new, then here’s what you need to do: 1. As always, put words taken from a source in quotations marks; do this even when borrowing even a single word. 2.As always, be sure to weave all quotations into the grammar of a sentence; there should be no “stand-alone” or “dropped” quotations. (If you do not know what those are, see here: http://academics.smcvt.edu/writingctr/Quotes.htm ) Your paragraph should read aloud smoothly and clearly. 3. If your quotation includes a change of line, follow the conventions of poetry by using a slash (/) to indicate a line break. See example below if you don’t have a clear idea of what this looks like in practice. 4. Follow quotation with a reference. For multi-book poems, give the book number first, then the line numbers, separating them with a period. End punctuation goes, of course, after the parenthesis. See the example below to get a sense of how this looks. 5. Remember that quotations are not self-explanatory. You need to set them up (make sure we see why they are there) and follow them up with direct, detailed analysis. See my example below.6. You don’t have to quote everything. Quote only when the exact language is important. Notice how I have, in my example below paraphrased details in my second sentence. 7. Avoid long quotations (although if you use them, employ the proper conventions). You want the focus to be on your analysis, not the quotation (notice how the example below focuses on analysis while grounding it firmly in details), and a long quotation would need lots of follow-up analysis. It is generally better to break long quotation into smaller pieces and analyze them bit by bit. Example of paragraph integrating a quotation Hera embodies contradictory motivations, including a concern for others that one might expect from the goddess of family and childbirth as well as acting for self-focused purposes. Hera’s hatred for the Trojans certainly motivates her support for the Greeks, and she demonstrates her alignment with them early in the epic when she works against Apollo’s deadly arrows by planting the idea in Achilles to call an assembly. Nurturing emotion motivates her aid, as “she cared for the Greeks and it pained her / To see them dying” (1.64-65). Yet despite her personal grudge against the Trojans, her first action on the Greek’s behalf is presented as one of caring, not of politics; however, it, too, has a selfish motive, as it her action is an attempt to avoid personal pain as well as to save Greek lives.Exercises 1. As we begin in medias res, it is clear that Achilles and Agamemnon have a history of resentment. This isn’t the first time they have tangled, and this is conveyed in the way they speak to and about each other. It is sometimes conveyed by how they avoid speaking about each other. They also know how to push each other’s buttons. The text describes it as “a stand-off, their battle of words” (1.318).Look at their interactions from pp. 231-238. Pretend I’m one of those clueless people who always sees the best in others. My reaction to this conversation is that, yes, tempers were lost, but surely everyone is a friend and no one really meant anything bad by this. So explain to me how each man makes “verbal blows” at the other: in other words, where and how do each “push the other’s buttons” or use “fighting words?” Find at least 2 places for each man where they take a verbal swipe at the other. Identify them for me, then (remember that I am clueless and need to have it spelled out) explain exactly why these words could be considered blows in a verbal battle. You can organize this any way you want: a list or a chart may work best (although you can use paragraphs if that works best for you). Still not sure what I’m getting at? I’ll get you started (this example I use is off-limits to you — find others). Remember to find two “verbal blows” that each man makes (so you’ll have at least 4 total).First blow:Achilles, pp. 231-232: What he says: maybe we should give up, since we have to fight both a war and a plague. Or we could consult a prophet. Why these are “fighting words?”: his tone is sarcastic; he doesn’t really suggest sailing as a live option. This sarcasm is shown in the phrase “assuming any of us are left alive” (1.68), too. The more sensible option (consult a prophet) is spoken with a kind of “duh” tone to it. Pushing buttons? Calling the council and making suggestions seems to be the work of the commander (Agamemnon), but Achilles does it. The criticism of the way the war is going is criticism of him.Got the idea? You pick up from here 2. Write one meaty paragraph: what is Agamemnon’s personality like and why do you think so? 3. Write one meaty paragraph: what is Achilles’ personality like and why do you think so? What do his actions after his verbal fight with Agamemnon add to your picture of him? 4. Powerful language: choose a passage of at least 3 lines but no more than 6 from pp. 239-242. Why do you like it? What do both its ideas and language convey? 5. Focusing on their actions and words, examine the relationship between Zeus and Hera. If you could sum it up in one word, what would that word be? Then, in a paragraph, explain why you have chosen that word and how you see it in the way they respond to each other. When you are finished, submit your completed exercises in the appropriate dropbox. You can find it under the Course Content for this unit, “Assignments,” or here: Unit 2B: Iliad Book 1 Exercises